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15
Jun

Historiographical Sources from the Strahov Library

In 2016, the Library of the Royal Canonry of Premonstratensians at Strahov has digitised a large collection of modern historiographical sources. These include extensive works (the German version of a part of the Memoirs of Count Vilém Slavata and the volumes of Annales Ferdinandei by Franz Christoph Khevenhüller, important for the study of the development of their final version) as well as sources on individual monasteries (Strahov, Doksany, and Svatý Kopeček near Olomouc).

15
Dec

Maps from the National Library of the Czech Republic

The set of 109 digitised maps comes from the 18th and 19th centuries. Individual maps and plans cover various parts of Europe, especially Italy, Austria, Hungary, East-Central Europe (Galicia, Poland and Russia) and the lands of the Balkan peninsula. They include geographical as well as special (railway, postal etc.) maps.

15
Dec

Manuscripts from the National Library of the Czech Republic

The recently digitised medieval manuscripts from the National Library are relatively varied in their content. Apart from the most common theological and preaching texts and liturgical codices, they also comprise ancient literature (VIII H 24), rhetorical (VIII H 22), medical (VIII H 34), historiographical (XIII D 7) or hagiographical (XIV E 8) texts. In the Middle Ages, codices XIII D 7 and XIII F 12 formed part of the library of Charles College of the Prague university. They are included in its earliest library inventory. The manuscripts likewise come from other large medieval institutional libraries: the Augustinian monastery in Třeboň and the Cistercian monastery in Zlatá Koruna. Czech-language manuscripts are represented by three volumes of the Bible, illuminated manuscripts mainly by the prayer book VI G 24.

15
Dec

An Early Printed Book from the Museum of the Vysočina Region in Havlíčkův Brod

The first digitised document from the collections of the Museum of the Vysočina Region in Havlíčkův Brod is an evangelical postil by Martin Philadelphus Zámrský, which was printed in Leipzig in 1602. The incompletely preserved early printed book was also restored before the digitisation.

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