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13
Oct

Manuscripts from the Museum of the Jindřichův Hradec Region

The Museum of the Jindřichův Hradec Region digitised 15 modern manuscripts in 2020. The oldest of them is an incomplete prayer book from 1541 (shelf mark RK 055). Most of the others come from the 18th century and contain Czech- and German-language prayers, usually accompanied by simple decoration. The manuscript of an invitatorium with psalms and hymns for the Feast of the Nativity (shelf mark RK 050) is partly notated. A manuscript that differs from the others in content comprises a collection of German culinary and medicinal recipes (shelf mark RK 146), which was complemented by information on book titles and prices at the turn of the 19th century.

13
Aug

Early Printed Books from the Museum of West Bohemia in Pilsen

Two early printed books from the Museum of West Bohemia in Pilsen were digitised in 2020. The Paris edition of Masses for the dead from 1682 (shelf mark 505 A 006) has its binding decorated with a gilded armorial binding stamp of the abbot of the Cistercian monastery in Plasy Evžen Tyttl. The printed book 505 D 006 from 1670 is also interesting for its contemporary binding, made for Pope Clement X.

13
Aug

Modern Manuscripts from the Regional Museum in Teplice

In 2020, the Regional Museum in Teplice provided access to four modern manuscripts. The oldest of them is a copy of the Revised Land Ordinance and of other related legal texts that was made in 1670 and was later part of the library of the Cistercian monastery in Osek. Works from the 18th century include a collection of culinary and medicinal recipes (MS 3) and a collection of songs for Adalbert Schöpke (MS 47). A memorial book of the shooting fellowship from Teplice (MS 94) was written at the turn of the 19th century.

13
Aug

Medieval Manuscripts from the National Museum Library

The National Museum Library has digitised another five medieval manuscripts from its collections, all of which come from the library of the Augustinian canonry in Roudnice nad Labem. The illuminated codex containing an extensive confession guide by Astesanus of Asti and other works to be used for confession (XVII A 4) was made in Paris in 1344; the commentaries by Bernardus de Montemirato on papal decretals and other legal texts (XVII A 16) were copied in the first third of the 14th century, most likely in Bologna; a commentary on the Decretum of Gratian by Guido de Baysio from the first half of the 14th century (XVII A 1) is likely to be of South European origin as well. Works coming from the second half of the 14th century include a patristic homiliary (XVI A 7) and a collection comprising commentaries on the Biblical prologues and provincial statutes of the archbishop of Prague Arnošt of Pardubice from 1349 (XVI A 11).

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